Accident guide

Do you find it fantastic to see your child zooming around on their bicycle? Or terrifying? We want them to enjoy riding but naturally we’re all somewhat nervous about a crash, or even worse, an injury. From the 2-year-old trying their first balance bike to the under-12 downhill champion as a parent you will be nervous to some extent.

Preparation and prevention

Having a plan can take some of the sting out of a mishap. Being prepared to deal with an accident will make it easier to encourage kids to let loose and have fun, whilst protecting their safety.

Of course, preventing the mishap is ideal. Teaching your child good cycling habits is one way to minimize risk. Lots of schools and areas run cycling lessons and training classes where children can learn all sorts of handling skills and safety tips. Alternatively, you could set up your own backyard obstacle course.

The rules of the road

If your child will be riding in the street, you’ll want them to understand the rules of the road and how to protect themselves. This means wearing a helmet, being bright and visible, and riding predictably. Even if they’ll just be staying close to home, they should know to stop at every corner and check for traffic.

What to do

If there is a crash, keeping calm is key. Your child easily picks up on panic, so it’s best to stay cool. Check for injuries. It’s also important to check the bike. For example, if the brakes have come loose and it’s not addressed, you may be inviting more danger up the road.

Once you confirm they are not seriously hurt, the best approach is one of support and encouragement. “That’s ok, let’s try again!” This is also a great opportunity for the child to learn better bike handling. Try to figure out together what caused the crash. Ask the child what, if anything, they might do differently next time. Above all, if they are upset, or even bleeding, wrap up today’s ride and come back to try another day.

For bigger accidents that cause a more serious injury, there will likely be a recovery process. Different children will return to cycling at different paces. Encourage, stay positive and optimistic, but do not push the child back on the bike until they’re ready.

Whatever the mishap, there’s no need to assume that a first crash is a big moment. Part of learning any physical activity is trying, practice, and learn from mistakes. Keep it fun and use positive encouragement, and your child will succeed.

Contacting Islabikes

If the bike has received serious damage or you are concerned about any aspect of the bike please contact us. We would recommend emailing in a few photographs of the bike damage, let us know the frame number as well as a description of what happened.  Please email that information to techsuppport@islabikes.co.uk and a member of our Technical Support team will get back to you.

Abus Smiley, 50 – 55cm

Abus Youn-I, 52 – 57cm

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